Company culture A topic of discussion in many business forums and on many motivational blogs

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

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No, this is not another post about the soon to be released blockbuster hit. Though I have your attention, now don’t I?

Company culture is a topic of discussion in many business forums and on many motivational blogs. If you are anyone in a professional setting, you have an opinion about how to nurture culture, why your service or product is better because of it and what to do when culture goes south. There is no black or white answer. Each company is ultimately unique, which creates many shades of gray.

As a leader who is passionate about guiding our clients through creating and practicing brand culture, my biggest challenge is to get them comfortable with those shades of gray, and even embrace them. After the get-to-know-you phase of the relationship, usually containing an overview of the business challenges and interviews with top leadership, clients and employees, there is a moment in time where it turns serious.

The honeymoon is over.

Many agencies keep it casual, but they run when the uncomfortable questions arise. In my opinion, this is the most intriguing part to dig into. This is where your deepest fears and desires as leaders are exposed. This is the root, the heart and soul of why you are in this business. Only the most successful leaders are willing to go there and explore those shades of gray in the name of building the best possible culture for their employees and customers alike.

Stripping a company down to its essence takes a level of trust and comfort. A trust that you will build their brand culture to be more meaningful and rewarding than it was before. Accepting and knowing where to push and where the boundaries lie is an art form. Navigating the gray areas and coming out with a new found clarity is essential to growing as a company, and a person. Ultimately, it takes a level of openness, confidence and vision to do that.

The rewards are well worth it in the end.

And for the record, I have read the book… only for the sake of studying different shades of gray in our culture, of course.

How do you encourage and live out your company culture? Share your thoughts with us on Twitter via @IntrinzicSays.

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